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Kyambogo University students innitiates 1k Campaign to run for the people of Karamoja who are starving

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STUDENTS TOGETHER TO SAVE THE STARVING LIVES IN KARAMOJA

1k campaign innitiative

The 1k campaign kicked off on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 by the President Karamoja Students Development Association and Pan African Child members a non profit organization led by kakembo Martin as the Executive director,Banada Peter, Kizito Julius,Nkwanga Micheal, Wafula Edrine,Mc Pombe,Enock, mulondo Enock,Farouk among others members.

This came after having a meeting at Mandela hall on how best they can help the people of Karamoja who are starving because of femine, during the meeting, several activities like car wash, Marathon and 1k Campaign were suggested by the members to be carried out so that acertain amount of money is raised.

However among the activities that could fun raise best was the1k Campaign dubbed with slogan “students together to Save the starving people of Karamoja.”

According to the reports,over 900 people have have so far died in different parts of Karamoja and South Lango region because of famine .

A photo of Daily monitor cover Page talking about the starving People of Karamoja

The donations are not only entitled to the 1thousand Ugx, one can also donate in form of materiality like food, clothings, shoes, among other as long as it can sustain.

Up-to-date 3Million Ugx has been collected out of the 2billion that these students aims at.

Collections of the 1k Campaign

The collections was from different faculties,halls of residence and schools that makes up kyambogo University.

The Campaign will be launched on Tuesday 2nd/08/2022 where different guests from others Universities are to be invited.

After the launch,the students aims at going to the members of diaspora (the general public) and others Universities so that they can give hand to the innitiative.

Join us today for the 1k Campaign

Below is the proposal of the innitiative


Background
The Karamoja region of northeastern Uganda is bordered on the east by the Rift Valley escarpment that drops down into the Kenya territory of Turkana, on the north by the Sudan, on the south by the Mt. Elgon region, and on the west by the home territories of the Teso, Langi, and Acholi peoples. A large region of approximately 27,200 square kilometers, it is dominated by the huge semi-arid plains of its center, where rainfall is seasonal, unpredictable, and too often sparse. In the north and south and along the eastern escarpment the land becomes more forested and mountainous, and in the west the area of the Labwor people is better watered.
 
Since the beginning of the twentieth century, Karamoja has been a region of sporadic political concern to outside authorities, first the British colonial rulers, and then the Ugandan national government. Karamoja has been seen by these outsiders as a land of lawlessness and primitive culture, inhabited by bloodthirsty people who preyed upon neighboring groups, and were irrationally attached to their cattle, who refused to participate in modern forms of government and the market economy, resisted formal education and Christianity, and avoided paying taxes. Because of its geographical location, Karamoja has also been seen as a strategic frontier, and thus, its perceived disorder is viewed as doubly dangerous.
 
The principal ethnic groups of Karamoja are classically identified within the “Karamojong Cluster,” i.e., the Dodoth in the north, the Jie in the center, and the Karimojong in the center-south. The Karimojong further divide themselves into three major regional and ethnic sub-groups, the Matheniko, Bokora, and Pian. The foundation of our knowledge of these groups is based on the major ethnographic works of the Gullivers and the Dyson-Hudsons. Other groups in the Karamojong Cluster outside of Karamoja are the Teso, the Turkana, and one or two smaller groups in southern Sudan. The principal Karamojong groups in Karamoja are all semi-nomadic pastoralists who also rely on seasonal horticultural production. An economically similar (although linguistically quite different) group, the Pakot or Suk, inhabits a territory in southeastern Karamoja that includes both Ugandan and Kenyan land. In western Karamoja is the relatively more fertile area of Labwor, where horticulture is the principal means of livelihood and the people are ethnically more similar to their Ugandan neighbors to the west. Several very small groups of ethnically marginalized people are also found literally on the fringes of Karamoja. The Tepeth or So are best known through the work of the Laughlins and Weatherby, while our information regarding the Teuso or Ik is sketchy and perhaps unreliable, and about the Nyakwai we know even less.
 
Much of the published research on Karamoja was done prior to the 1970’s. In the early 1970’s Karamoja entered a long period of turmoil and distress. As a series of governments were installed and then expelled by force of arms, the disorder at the center spread to the perifery and in Karamoja a wide-open trade in rifles and ammunition rapidly expanded. When the region was hit by a series of severe droughts and famine in the 1980’s, the social and economic fabric began to fray as armed groups engaged in continuous raiding and banditry. A brief summary of the effects of this disorder is provided by Quam. The published literature from this period largely reflects these troubled times. Much of it is based on analysis of relief efforts, and some of the more recent items come from the Centre for Basic Research in Kampala which published a series of reports and analytical pieces on the “crisis” in Karamoja.
 
As noted in the subtitle, this bibliography is limited to books and articles published in English. It does not include government reports or reports issued by international organizations. In the areas of history, ethnography, linguistics, and the social sciences, it is reasonably complete, however, there may be articles in the natural, medical, agricultural, and veterinary sciences that have escaped the compiler’s notice. With the establishment of a more peaceful situation in Karamoja, we can expect that new research will be conducted and reported soon in the scholarly press.

HUNGER

Hunger is a feeling of discomfort or weakness caused by lack of food, coupled with the desire to eat.
The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) last month said at least 518,000 people, or 40% of the region’s population, were facing high levels of food insecurity. Local legislator Faith Nakut estimated that at least 600 people had died of hunger in the region since early June.
A spokesman for the Prime Minister’s office, Julius Mucunguzi, said he had received reports of hunger-related deaths but was unable to give an exact total.
Eight in every 10 Karamojong households have no or limited food and leaders claim hunger-related diseases have killed more than 900 residents since start of the year, with the misery made worse by uptick in raids and massive crop failure as a result of drought. 
The suffering and pain in Karamoja, Uganda’s north-eastern pastoralist region, needs no hyperbole.
It is visible in massive crop failures as a result of a long dry spell. The scorched gardens and pasture mean limited or no food for both humans and their animals. Yet, cattle keeping provides main livelihood.

SOME OF THE BASIC CAUSES OF HUNGER ARE SOCIETAL, SUCH AS:
POVERTY:

When people are in a state of poverty, they lack the resources to cover their basic needs such as food, water, and shelter.
CONFLICT:
Conflict often uproots people from their homes and land, so food production dwindles or stops completely. Conflict also disrupts economies, so markets become unstable. This leaves people who are already vulnerable more susceptible to malnutrition.
GENDER INEQUALITY:
Though women produce the majority of food in developing countries and are typically the primary caregivers for children, gender inequality in societies leads to a higher malnutrition rate among women and girls.

OTHER CAUSES OF HUNGER ARE ENVIRONMENTAL, SUCH AS:
SEASONAL CHANGES:

For people who live in rural areas and rely on farming and livestock for food and income, seasonal changes in climate, along with food prices and availability, affect hunger. This results in annual cycles of hunger, known as the “hunger season,” that are devastating.
NATURAL DISASTERS:
Much like conflict, natural disasters can destroy homes, land, jobs, and markets. Until communities can be rebuilt, people affected by natural disasters are at greater risk for malnutrition. Climate change plays a role in increasing natural disasters.
LACK OF ACCESS TO SAFE WATER:
Unsafe or scarce water creates and exacerbates malnutrition. Without access to safe water, crops can’t grow properly, and people can’t survive or stay healthy.
If any of these basic or underlying factors are missing or not working properly, it’s more likely to trigger immediate issues that increase the risk of malnutrition.
HOW HUNGER HAS AFFECTED PEOPLE IN KARAMOJA
Insecurity, cattle rustling, COVID-19 after shock, rising food prices, climate change and limited resources are some of the factors pushing thousands of Karamojong households into destitution, according to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis released in Kampala on June 8.
Karamoja is one of the poorest regions in Uganda with a poverty rate of 66% more than three times the national poverty rate. But this is the first time in three years that all the nine districts of Karamoja; Abim, Amudat, Kaabong, Karenga, Kotido, Moroto, Nabilatuk, Nakapiripit and Napak are at food crisis level or worse.
The ongoing drought in the Horn of Africa has affected the Karamoja sub-region. High food prices have left many families unable to afford nutritious foods forcing them to find other ways to cope.  Some families have been forced to consume their seed stocks, leaving nothing for the planting season while others have had to borrow money or reduce expenditure on necessities such as education and health.
According to the latest analysis, over 40% of the population (518,000 people) in Karamoja is facing high levels of food insecurity. Last year, when similar analysis was done, the figure was about 30% (361,000 people).
Of the 518,000 people with high levels of food insecurity, 428,000 are experiencing phase three (crisis levels of food insecurity) and 90,000 people are at phase four (emergency levels of food insecurity).
In Moroto District, one of the nine districts that make up Karamoja sub-region of northeastern Uganda, over half of the population goes without any food for an entire day and night for at least three days a month.
Analysts say the situation has been exacerbated by insecurity that has driven people away from their homes and destabilized crop production. Cattle raids have robbed people of animals on which they depended for nutritious food. Delayed and unpredictable rainfall and diseases such as COVID-19 and malaria have further deepened the crisis.
“The situation in Karamoja is an example of how a perfect storm of climate change, conflict, rising food costs, the impact of Covid-19 and limited resources is increasing the number of hungry people,” said Abdirahman Meygag, the WFP Uganda Representative. “We urgently need more funding to respond to the immediate and long-term needs of thousands of vulnerable people in Karamoja.”
Young children and pregnant and breastfeeding women are among the most vulnerable in Karamoja. The IPC acute malnutrition analysis indicates that 91,600 children and 9,500 pregnant or breastfeeding women are acutely malnourished and in urgent need of treatment.
Around 2.4 % of children in Karamoja are severely malnourished – an increase from 1.9% in 2021. Another 10.7% of children are moderately malnourished, up from 8.8%.
In Kotido, Napak, Nabilatuk and Amudat districts, acute malnutrition is at critical levels while Karenga, Abim and Nakapiripit are on alert. Except for Abim and Karenga districts that have registered a slight improvement, acute malnutrition has worsened in all the other seven districts.
Acute malnutrition can be prevented and treated, but the Karamoja regions needs urgent action and support, according to the experts.
At 4,791, Moroto district has the highest absolute number of children who are severely malnourished. Moroto, Kotido, Kaabong districts account for almost 55 % of children under five years in need of malnutrition treatment in Karamoja sub-region.
“We must not wait for thousands of children to die. We have said never again too many times. We need long term and predictable funding to help these children and their families,” Munir Safieldin, UNICEF Representative to Uganda, said.
Malnutrition is at critical levels in Kaabong and Moroto districts. In addition to putting children at high risk of dying, malnutrition can have a life-long impact on society and those it affects, especially children. The lives of thousands of children are at stake.
There is always less concentration for students in class because of hunger and this will later affect the education in karamoja which will leave most of the students and children uneducated.

OBJECTIVES
To provide food to the people of Karamoja
To provide basic needs to the people of Karamoja
To restore confidence to the people of Karamoja
To build the spirit of brotherhood and solidarity amongst students
To create awareness about the deteriorating situation in Karamoja
TARGET GROUPS
Young children
Elderly
Pregnant mothers

ACTIVITES TO BE CARRIED OUT
1)1K CAMPAIGN
2) MARATHON
3)CAR WASH
4)VISITING SCHOOLS AND UNIVERSITIES
5)REACHING OUT TO INDIVIDUALS
6)VISITING COMPANIES
7)VISITING PLACES OF WORSHIP

EXPECTED OUT COME
We are planning to meet and help over 300 families
ESTIMATED BUDGET
ITEMS
QUANTITY
COST
TOTAL COST

Maize flour
5kgs
4500
22500

Beans
5kgs
4000
20000

Soap
2 bars
8000
16000

Pads
2 packets
3000
6000

Salt
1kg
2000
2000

Sugar
3kgs
4000
12000

Cooking oil
3 litters
4000
12000

Sorghum
1 kg
7000
7000

Cassava flour
3kgs
2700
8100

Total

105600

Transport= 2,000,000
Mschellenous = 2,000,000
Target 300 homes
1 Home 105600
300 homes = 31680000
When transport and mschellenous = 35680000

for more information contact Kizito Julius on+256 708 248371

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